Permanent Residence

Requirements for Permanent Residency are as follows:

The grounds for your residence permit must have been largely the same throughout seven years, and the conditions for your original residence permit must still be met.
You must have completed an introduction programme as dictated by the Integration Act, or a similar programme.
You must have completed planned activities as dictated by the Activation Act (Lov om aktiv beskftigelsesindsats).
You must have passed the integration test. In order to pass this test, you must have held a full-time job for two years and six months, and have passed either the Danish language test, level 2 (Prve i Dansk 2) or the Danish language test, level 1 (Prve i Dansk 1) as well as an English language test corresponding to the level of the Danish language test, level 2 (Prve i Dansk 2). (This condition does not apply to all applicants, see below).
You must not have been sentenced to two or more years in prison for serious crimes, such as drug offences, trafficking, murder, assault or rape. If you have been convicted of a less serious crime, the date on which you will be eligible for a permanent residence permit will be postponed.
You must not have any overdue public debt.

In certain situations, you can be granted a permanent residence permit after legally residing in Denmark for five years. In addition to the normal conditions, all the following conditions must also be met:

You must have held permanent employment or been self-employed during the three years prior to your application.
You may not have received public assistance under the terms of the Active Social Policy Act or the Integration Act at any point within the past three years.
You must be able to document a significant, tangible connection to Danish society.

In rare situations, you can be granted a permanent residence permit after legally residing in Denmark for only three years. In addition to the normal conditions, all the following conditions must also be met:

Before being granted your present residence permit on the grounds of asylum, you must have previously held a Danish residence permit for a number of years based on, e.g., work, studies or as an au pair.
You must have held permanent employment or been self-employed during the entire three-year period.
You may not have received public assistance under the terms of the Active Social Policy Act or the Integration Act at any point during the past three years.
You must be able to document a significant, tangible connection to Danish society.

In accordance with special EU regulations, EU citizens and their families may obtain permanent residence following five years’ legal residence in Denmark. The Immigration Service and state administration can advise you about your rights in connection with permanent residence.

Ask Philip Gamble whether you (or your children) have a claim to British nationality.

ASK PHILIP GAMBLE NOW!
Learn more about these routes to British Nationality:

WhatPassport.com is a specialist UK Nationality and British Citizenship site offering an online search and assessment. Claims to hold a British Passport can be complex and the site offers a quick, simple search to give you the answers. While many people qualify for the UK Ancestry Visa based on holding a Commonwealth passport with a UK born grandmother or grandfather, we have found that if you have a grandparent born in the UK, or if your mother is British or your father is British, then there are several scenarios where you can claim British Nationality and the right to hold a British Passport. This stems from Britain’s collection of British Colonies, British Protectorates and British Protected States in the middle of last century and the Nationality rules concerning what are now the countries of the Commonwealth.