United Kingdom - flag United Kingdom - Passport & Nationality - British Citizenship (Stateless)

Where a person is born stateless, they can sometimes take on the nationality of one of their parents.

Statelessness is not a desirable position to be in and will cause long term disadvantage unless it is addressed. There are a few remaining provisions in British nationality law to address statelessness for those from former British Territories where old colonial statuses were held by parents at the time of one's birth.

In most cases of "statelessness", a person is born without nationality. If the child, one of the parents, or the father's father (paternal grandfather) was born in a former British territory, it may be possible for this person to be registered as a British citizen.

Finally, it should be mentioned that if a minor is born (and remains) stateless, then it is important to address this in good time before they turn 18. Several rights to register as a British citizen fall away at that point and can be lost forever.

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Ask Philip Gamble whether you (or your children) have a claim to British nationality.

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Learn more about these routes to British Nationality:

WhatPassport.com is a specialist UK Nationality and British Citizenship site offering an online search and assessment. Claims to hold a British Passport can be complex and the site offers a quick, simple search to give you the answers. While many people qualify for the UK Ancestry Visa based on holding a Commonwealth passport with a UK born grandmother or grandfather, we have found that if you have a grandparent born in the UK, or if your mother is British or your father is British, then there are several scenarios where you can claim British Nationality and the right to hold a British Passport. This stems from Britain’s collection of British Colonies, British Protectorates and British Protected States in the middle of last century and the Nationality rules concerning what are now the countries of the Commonwealth.